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Ships by Class/Type: Sailing Vessels
This forum is for sailing ships both civilian and military of any era.
Hosted by Todd Michalak
Pyro Pinta build
TRM5150
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Posted: Friday, February 27, 2015 - 05:47 PM GMT+7
Off and running!! Looking good Tim! Nice little modification...much cleaner now!! Keep it going!!
JClapp
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Posted: Friday, February 27, 2015 - 02:38 AM GMT+7
Oh good, was looking forward to this.

Ive seen those Life Like kits on that auction site, never would have guessed they were ex-Pyro. Thats interesting that the kits were re-issued.

do carry on!
TimReynaga
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Posted: Friday, February 27, 2015 - 01:44 AM GMT+7
Welcome aboard guys!

Original Pyro kits are hard to find, but there were a couple of the Life-Like reissues available at an online auction site, and so these will do just as well (Pinta is the hull on the right).



As far as I can tell the Life-Like reissue was exactly the same as the Pyro original – although by the time this one came out in the early 1970s the price had jumped from 60 to 90 cents! I don’t think the kit is available new at the moment. Lindberg owns the molds now; I believe they last released it as part of a Niña-Pinta-Santa María commemorative set in 1992. That and earlier issues can often be found at the usual auction sites, though.

The hull/deck went together quickly. As with Niña, I intend to do La Pinta as a straightforward out of the box build. The one small modification I couldn't resist making was to cut away the unconvincing molded-on shroud ends from the channels on the hull sides.


RussellE
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Posted: Wednesday, February 25, 2015 - 09:49 PM GMT+7
I'm along for the ride too
Cosimodo
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Posted: Wednesday, February 25, 2015 - 08:51 PM GMT+7
Hi Tim,
this should be something different to watch so I will be following along to see how you go with this.

cheers
Michael
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Posted: Wednesday, February 25, 2015 - 05:50 PM GMT+7
Count me in as well Tim. Looking forward to another gem.
John
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Posted: Wednesday, February 25, 2015 - 03:39 PM GMT+7
Count me in Tim!! Enjoyed the last one very much!! Looking forward to seeing you add to the collection!!
ejhammer
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Posted: Wednesday, February 25, 2015 - 02:07 PM GMT+7
I've not done a plastic sailing ship, but have a couple in the stash, one is the Russian XVIII century navy Goto Predestinatsia, an ARK Models kit, 1:72. Won it at a show a while back. No instruction book, just an exploded diagram and a pattern sheet for cutting the cloth sails. Looks interesting. I do wooden boat and ship kits in between aircraft carrier builds and enjoy them.
I'll be following your builds, hopefully picking up some tips along the way that will assist on this kit.
Thanks for posting.

EJ
TimReynaga
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Posted: Wednesday, February 25, 2015 - 01:46 PM GMT+7
EJ,

Yes, the kit is polystyrene plastic released by Pyro in 1966 to go along with with their Niña kit.

ejhammer
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Posted: Wednesday, February 25, 2015 - 01:38 PM GMT+7
Will be following with interest Tim. I assume these are plastic kits?

EJ
TimReynaga
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Posted: Wednesday, February 25, 2015 - 01:26 PM GMT+7
Hi all!

I had such a good time recently with Pyro’s ancient Niña kit that before it was even finished I went and found a Pinta and a Santa María to go along with it!



I thought I‘d start with the Pinta, the ship of Columbus’ famous fleet about which we know the least. Like the Niña, the Pinta was a small carabela redonda (caravel). She was square rigged, probably about 73-75 feet in length, and had a crew of 26 (compared to Niña’s 24 and Santa María’s 40). The only historical records concerning the ship have to do with Columbus’ voyage of discovery in 1492. What we do know is that the Pinta was owned by Cristóbal Quintero of Palos, and that she was commandeered by Queen Ysabel (Isabella) of Castile for Columbus’ voyage. The ship was captained by Martín Alonso Pinzón, an experienced mariner ten years Columbus’ senior. Columbus mentions in his log that shortly after leaving Spain the Pinta had rudder trouble, but he was confident that Pinzón, “a man of energy and ingenuity”, could resolve the problem - which he did. Pinta’s captain was also reputedly instrumental in helping Columbus calm the mutinous crew of the Santa María during the outward passage. Unfortunately, Pinzón’s energy and ingenuity were not matched with discipline; throughout the voyage he had a habit of sailing off ahead and losing contact with the rest of the fleet. On October 12, 1492, this resulted in Pinta’s seaman Rodrigo de Triana being the first European since the Vikings to set eyes on the New World (although Columbus later cheated the man of his reward, claiming to have seen land himself the night before!) Later, as the fleet explored the Caribbean islands, Pinta again disappeared (apparently hunting for gold) for nearly four months before rejoining Columbus. No gold was found, but Pinta had earned the distinction of being the first European ship to reach Haiti. Finally, as the ships were headed home, Captain Pinzón’s Pinta again abandoned Columbus midocean and became the first ship to reach Europe with news of the Discovery.

After that… nothing. There was the so-called “Molasses Reef wreck” found in Turks & Caicos Islands near Cuba in 1976 which was thought by some to have been the Pinta, but although of the correct size and age, no evidence for any specific identification of the wreck has ever been found. As far as history is concerned, the story of the Pinta ends with her arrival home at Palos, Spain in 1493.